Forget Karma: God is Watching (1 Samuel 26:23)


If the Lord gave you what you really deserved, would you be ready for it? Would you look forward to it with joy or does the thought frighten you? What we fail to recognize is that it is not just a hypothetical question. 

The Lord render to every man his righteousness and his faithfulness: (1 Samuel 26:23)

These were words spoken by David when he interacted with King Saul who sought to kill him. He knew that God was sovereign and would return upon men that which they have rendered to others. The same still holds true today. The New Testament describes the principle as sowing and reaping. What you sow, you will also reap. It may take some time before it arrives, but it is coming. Just like it takes all summer for apples to grow and ripen on a tree, it may take most of a person’s life before they reap what they sow, but be sure, they will reap.  

Much of this principle concerning sowing and reaping is in relation to how we treat other people. If we sow righteousness towards others, then we will get righteous treatment back, but if we sow wickedness then wickedness awaits us.

Some may ask, “What guideline could I follow that would aid me in sowing righteousness?” The answer would be to love your neighbor as yourself. (Matthew 22:39). If you allow your actions to be motivated by what is best for another person or make decisions that enable you to meet the needs of someone else instead of focusing on yourself, you will most consistently sow righteousness. This doesn’t require you to give all of your money to the poor or even to live a dejected life. It only requires you to start focusing on others instead of yourself. Give somebody recognition. Show patience and mercy, try looking at situations from the other person’s perspective or even take time to listen to people and their problems are opportunities that each of us have to sow righteousness. It will not cost you one penny, but it will be an investment worth millions of dollars.

For you, the world of people is a field ready for planting. What kind of seeds will you sow?

Fainted and Scattered (Matthew 9:36)

It is not difficult for anyone to see that the lives of so many people today are just a mess. How did they get this way? Why don’t they just get it together and do whatever needs to be done?

But when he saw the multitudes, he was moved with compassion on them, because they fainted, and were scattered abroad, as sheep having no shepherd. (Matthew 9:36)

From this passage, it appears that people become weak in life’s struggle and instead of continuing to fight on, they relax their resistance and faint. When this occurs, the person’s life then becomes subject to the problems and trials of life. Their lives get tossed about from side to side being cast about and cast down. This does not occur as a result of the weakness of the individual, because none of us have the ability to stand against the enemy. This occurs because of the absence of a shepherd in the person’s life. Sometimes there is not a shepherd because salvation has not yet been experienced, but other times it is because the person becomes estranged from their shepherd savior. Whether it be by confusion of doctrine, ill treatment from those in the body of Christ, person hurts and losses or sin: the separation occurs.

Today there are countless believers tossed about. They are away from their shepherd and the way to bring them back into the fold is to love them back. Bearing their burdens (Galatians 6:2) is the act of you bringing your strength to those who are weak until they can once again gain the strength for living that can only come from their shepherd.

He Touched Him (Matthew 8:3)


Many times, there are behaviors that people do that are overlooked by most. Some people wring their hands as they think about something that disturbs them. Others may brush their hair from their face when they are nervous. The behavior isn’t really important, but what is important is the motivation behind the behavior.

And Jesus put forth his hand, and touched him, … Matthew 8:3

As I consider the passage recording Jesus healing the leper, I cannot help but ask my self questions in regard to Jesus’ behavior. One question is why did Jesus touch the leper? He didn’t need to touch him in order to heal because the next few verses record Jesus healing the centurion’s servant who was some distance away.

Consider this. When do you think was the last time the leper was touched. I don’t mean being pushed as he fought for food or random interaction among lepers, but when was the last time the leper experienced a tender affectionate hand rest upon the side of his face? When did he last feel a grasp on his should like that of a loving father who rests his hand upon the shoulder of his son? It had probably been an extremely long time. I believe that after years of rejection from society and solitude living, the touch was God’s display of affection to the leper. It seems that as Jesus’s hand gently rested on the leper, a part of the leper revived and his heart filled with the experience of God’s love.

Did you know that God wants you to have that same experience of his love. Regardless of whatever is in your past, God wants to have a relationship with you. He loves you dearly and has done–through Jesus’ work on the cross–everything that is necessary for that relationship to occur. Come before and ask as the leper did and ask. The relationship is greater than you can imagine.

Moved to Compassion (Luke 7:13)



One of the attributes of God is that he is omniscient, which means that he is all knowing.  He knows all that has occurred in the past, he knows what is in the heart of man and what is taking place currently, and he knows what will happen in the future.

When God became man, he cloaked his diety: that is to say that as God, Jesus functioned as a man and only accessed his divine powers and abilities as directed by the father.

In this passage when Jesus came face to face with the widow, he, as God, saw her and her condition for the first time.  What occurred revealed the nature of God towards man.  The scriptures state that when he saw her, he had compassion on her.  From this, we can know that as God looks upon us, he will be moved with compassion towards us.  Although his plan may require that we endure particular hardships in life, but nonetheless his heart is moved with compassion.

We too should have compassion on others.  What is needed for this to occur is to see individuals in their state.  This may come from visual sight or Holy Spirit illumination.  It is difficult to have compassion on someone if you cannot see them.  So in order for us to have compassion, we must see them.

Do I Really Care? (2 Timothy 1:4)

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If we knew how others viewed us, how many would say that we are self centered or all we think about is ourselves? The number may surprise us. In defense, we may point out the many times that we have reached out with aid to others. We may speak of how we support others in need or simply how we act kindly towards others. The question is, “Is that enough?”

Is it enough to perform actions of kindness and charity? I think not. Actions can be just that: simply actions. We can perform acts of kindness without the true motive for our actions being known. Guilt, fear of rejection and pride can each be a motivation for kind acts and if they are, the works performed will not be acts of kindness.

In his letter to Timothy, the Apostle Paul best describes this virtue. Greatly desiring to see thee, being mindful of thy tears, that I may be filled with joy; (2 Timothy 1:4). True kindness occurs as a result of empathy. Paul describes this emotion as “being mindful of thy tears”. The word mindful comes from two words meaning “to stay” and “to chew”. We are mindful about something when we continue to roll the idea over in our minds. For those being kind, they are rolling over in their minds the hurts and pains of others which causes them tears.

They may continually think of their friend’s hurt from losing a loved one. They focus on the pain and sickness of others and carry those burdens with them. When friends are absent from church or just out of touch, they wonder how they are doing and if they are abounding through their circumstances. These are the thoughts of a person who cares.

So let me ask you, do you really care about others? To find out, let your thoughts be your judge.

Loving Kindness and Tender Mercy (Psalm 51:1)

Mercy occurs because of what is in God and is not brought on or motivated by the need of a helpless transgressor.

Have mercy upon me, O God, according to thy lovingkindness: according unto the multitude of thy tender mercies blot out my transgressions. (Psalms 51:1)

God’s mercy or act of having pity towards man is based on his loving kindness and tender mercies. Loving kindness occurs when he displays favor towards someone. An example of this is found in the book of Esther. When the uninvited Queen Esther approached the King, the King showed loving kindness by putting forth the sceptre and receiving her. Similarly, this is God’s response to man. But even greater than loving kindness is tender mercy. Tender mercy comes from a word meaning the womb or the bowels. As the tender love of a mother towards the baby that she carries, so is God’s love towards us. In spite of us falling into sin, he yearns deeply inside for us. It is this deep yearning that causes him to exercise mercy towards us.

Many times when we wrong people, we try to perform actions that may turn their heart to forgive us. With God it is not necessary. By tender mercy he takes the first step and reaches out to man. It is his tender mercy that brings conviction, repentance and confession. If it were not for his loving kindness and tender mercy we would be without hope.

As you grow in grace, allow God to develop this loving kindness and tender mercy towards those around you. As long as you continue to focus on yourself and your own needs, you will never reach this state. However when you esteem others better than yourself and look on the needs of them as stated in Philippians 2:4, you will begin to grow into the image of Christ.

Look not every man on his own things, but every man also on the things of others. (Philippians 2:4)

If you would like to read more of these thoughts in a hard copy format, my new book is now available at the link below.

https://www.createspace.com/4441566

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Miracles Start With Compassion (Mark 6:34)

Miracles performed by Jesus were always for a specific purpose. For nearly all miracles a specific connection between Jesus and people can be identified and because of this connection, the miracle was performed. In the miracle of feeding five thousand, the connection was between Jesus and the multitude and was expressed with the words “and was moved with compassion toward them.”

Because of compassion, God chooses to meet our daily needs. He does not answer prayer or supply our needs because of our standard of living or because we abstained for sin, for there is not a single person on the earth who has abstained or could abstain from sin to a measure that would please God (Romans 7:15, 18). God meets our needs because of his compassion.

We must remember that our physical, emotional and spiritual needs are met because of the compassion of God. His compassion is greater than the miracle. Create more bread and fish? Not a problem, but to overcome the effects that sinners have brought to your heart is another matter. Compassion is a by product of love and for God to love us is the greatest miracle of all.

As you read the miracle accounts, consider God and the part that his compassion plays in each act. As you consider miracles and answered prayers that have occurred in your life, praise him for those works and also for his love and compassion that motivated them.

If you would like to read more of these thoughts in a hard copy format, my new book is now available at the link below.

https://www.createspace.com/4441566

To view other posts or to receive this blog by email, sign up at drafusco.wordpress.com