Forget Karma: God is Watching (1 Samuel 26:23)


If the Lord gave you what you really deserved, would you be ready for it? Would you look forward to it with joy or does the thought frighten you? What we fail to recognize is that it is not just a hypothetical question. 

The Lord render to every man his righteousness and his faithfulness: (1 Samuel 26:23)

These were words spoken by David when he interacted with King Saul who sought to kill him. He knew that God was sovereign and would return upon men that which they have rendered to others. The same still holds true today. The New Testament describes the principle as sowing and reaping. What you sow, you will also reap. It may take some time before it arrives, but it is coming. Just like it takes all summer for apples to grow and ripen on a tree, it may take most of a person’s life before they reap what they sow, but be sure, they will reap.  

Much of this principle concerning sowing and reaping is in relation to how we treat other people. If we sow righteousness towards others, then we will get righteous treatment back, but if we sow wickedness then wickedness awaits us.

Some may ask, “What guideline could I follow that would aid me in sowing righteousness?” The answer would be to love your neighbor as yourself. (Matthew 22:39). If you allow your actions to be motivated by what is best for another person or make decisions that enable you to meet the needs of someone else instead of focusing on yourself, you will most consistently sow righteousness. This doesn’t require you to give all of your money to the poor or even to live a dejected life. It only requires you to start focusing on others instead of yourself. Give somebody recognition. Show patience and mercy, try looking at situations from the other person’s perspective or even take time to listen to people and their problems are opportunities that each of us have to sow righteousness. It will not cost you one penny, but it will be an investment worth millions of dollars.

For you, the world of people is a field ready for planting. What kind of seeds will you sow?

Fruit With Patience (Luke 8:15)



Recently, I posted online a picture of a tomato plant from my garden.  Hanging from that plant in mid-June were a few golf ball sized tomatoes.  My caption, “Come on” were my words of anticipation for the delicious fruit to get here.  In order to get to this point, it took a great deal of time.  I first prepared the soil and planted the seeds in little cups.  Throughout April and early May, I nurtured the plants with water and exposure to the sun.  Around Mothers’ day, they were planted in the ground followed by pruning, watering and weeding.  In all, it should take about 10 weeks before I will get the fruit that I desire.  Fruit just takes time.

But that on the good ground are they, which in an honest and good heart, having heard the word, keep it, and bring forth fruit with patience. (Luke 8:15)

It also takes time to produce the fruit of God.  It is easy to make fruit that shows on the outside and you can do it in no time at all, but it might not really be fruit.  Change your clothes, change your hair, you can even change your words and the places your feet may take you.  However, true fruit takes time and first begins on the inside of the believer and like any fruit bearing plant, it will take time to grow.  It begins with a seed of truth from God’s word.  If we yield to it, it will begin to grow.  Each day, we will need to keep or guard this truth in our hearts.  As we do, the early signs of fruit will begin to show: much like my small green tomatoes.  Over time, the truth will become a habit that we have put on.  If you continue the process, you will grow and your fruit will yield 30, 60 and even 100 fold. (Mark 4:8)

Moved to Compassion (Luke 7:13)



One of the attributes of God is that he is omniscient, which means that he is all knowing.  He knows all that has occurred in the past, he knows what is in the heart of man and what is taking place currently, and he knows what will happen in the future.

When God became man, he cloaked his diety: that is to say that as God, Jesus functioned as a man and only accessed his divine powers and abilities as directed by the father.

In this passage when Jesus came face to face with the widow, he, as God, saw her and her condition for the first time.  What occurred revealed the nature of God towards man.  The scriptures state that when he saw her, he had compassion on her.  From this, we can know that as God looks upon us, he will be moved with compassion towards us.  Although his plan may require that we endure particular hardships in life, but nonetheless his heart is moved with compassion.

We too should have compassion on others.  What is needed for this to occur is to see individuals in their state.  This may come from visual sight or Holy Spirit illumination.  It is difficult to have compassion on someone if you cannot see them.  So in order for us to have compassion, we must see them.

God’s Countenance (Hebrews 5:2)

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What countenance is on God’s face? The varied answers that people may give would be based on each person’s perspective of God. As a child, I disappointed my parents on many occasions and on each of these their countenance was negative in nature reflecting anger, frustration, disappointment or dissatisfaction. Is God the same way? Does his countenance change towards me? For those who are away from God, what is his countenance like? Is he angry? Is he frustrated? Thankfully from the scriptures, we can see that his countenance would be one that reflects compassion.

Who can have compassion on the ignorant, and on them that are out of the way; for that he himself also is compassed with infirmity. (Hebrews 5:2)

Compassion? That doesn’t seem like a relevant response to a disobedient believer. Why would he be compassionate? Why wouldn’t he display a negative response towards their lack of regard for his love, salvation and provision? The reason is simple. He has compassion, because he experienced the struggles that we face and the many infirmities that we bear.

As a man, he felt hunger, pain, sorrow and loneliness. Disappointment followed him continually and in his greatest hour of need, he was abandoned by all on earth and in Heaven. He knows that we are not as strong as him and that we are prone to sin and wander. So with compassion, he patiently waits. Oh, don’t get me wrong. God still hates sin and never condones it, but he loves us still. He knows that what we need the most during times of discouragement, fear, failure and sorrow is a compassionate friend.

He will continue to work in your life and patiently wait for your return. The days that you are away from him are a loss to you. He will not force you to come back. We must understand that we are not returning to an angry God, but instead to a compassionate father.

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